Laura Malkiewich

Laura Malkiewich

Laura Malkiewich is an ILT fellow in her third year of the Cognitive Studies in Education PhD program. She is also pursuing an MS in Learning Analytics. Laura received her BA in Psychology from Stanford University where she did research on embodied cognition and stereotype lift under Lera Boroditsky and Greg Walton respectively. Her current research looks at how instructional technologies motivate students to pursue and master robust understandings of STEM concepts. Her dissertation work is focused on motivation during the transfer process, specifically on how to best scaffold students during constructionist activities in order for transfer to occur. She is interested in the role that student agency and the timing of direct instruction play in motivating students to integrate canonical knowledge into their work during an engineering design process.


  • Lee, A., Malkiewich, L., and Slater, S. (in press). Understanding the Gap: Gender Similarities and
    Differences in Persistence and Self-Efficacy in a Coding Game. To be published in the proceedings
    of the 12th Games+Learning+Society Conference, Madison, WI.
  • Malkiewich, L., Lee, A., Slater, S. and Chase, C. (in press). Tenacious Assessments: Using In-Game Behaviors to Measure Student Persistence and Challenge Navigation. To be published in the
    proceedings of the 12th Games+Learning+Society Conference, Madison, WI.
  • Malkiewich, L. J., Baker, R., Shute, V., Kai, S., Paquette, L. (2016, June). Classifying Behavior to Elucidate Elegant Problem Solving in an Educational Game. Paper presented at the 9th International Conference on Educational Data Mining, Raleigh, NC.
  • Malkiewich, L. J., Lee, A., Slater, S., Xing, C., Chase, C. (2016, June). No Lives Left: How Game Features Can Undermine Persistence, Challenge-Seeking, and Learning to Program. Paper presented at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Singapore.
  • Malkiewich, L. J., Xing, C., Slater, S., Lee, A., Chase, C. (2016, April). Game Over: Detrimental Effects of Game Features on Persistence and Learning of Computer Programming. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.